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CASE REPORT
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 91-95

A case of late-onset vitamin K deficiency bleeding in an exclusively breastfed infant emphasizing the need for revision of vitamin K prophylaxis policy


1 Department of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion, Jubilee Mission Medical College and Research Institute, Thrissur, Kerala, India
2 Department of Pediatrics, Jubilee Mission Medical College and Research Institute, Thrissur, Kerala, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Aboobacker Mohamed Rafi
Department of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion, Jubilee Mission Medical College and Research Institute, Thrissur, Kerala
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/gjtm.gjtm_2_22

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A 4-month-old male child presented with a history of seizure and vomiting. There was no history of fever, fall, or any other trauma. On examination, there was anisocoria, and anterior fontanelle was bulging and nonpulsating. Computerized tomography revealed an acute on chronic bilateral subdural hematoma (left > right) with a midline shift. He had no relevant past or family history suggestive of any bleeding disorder. Blood investigations revealed anemia with prolonged prothrombin time (PT)/international normalized ratio/and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). Mixing study was done and it showed a correction with pooled normal plasma. The possibility of coagulation factor deficiency was confirmed. Further, mixing studies and factor assays revealed normal levels of fibrinogen and Factor VIII, with a reduced level of Factor IX. Since both PT and APTT were prolonged and Factor IX level was low, a deficiency of Vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors was suspected. The child was immediately given intravenous Vitamin K injection. The diagnosis of Vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) was confirmed by protein induced by Vitamin K absence testing. Unfortunately, the child succumbed to the complications of the intracranial bleed.


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