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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 186-189

Sero-prevalence of COVID-19 in blood donors of North India – Single-center report


1 Department of Transfusion Medicine, Medanta Institute of Education and Research, Medanta The Medicity, Gurgaon, Haryana, India
2 Medanta Institute of Education and Research, Medanta The Medicity, Gurgaon, Haryana, India

Correspondence Address:
Swati Pabbi
Department of Transfusion Medicine, Medanta Institute of Education and Research, Medanta The Medicity, Gurgaon, Haryana
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/gjtm.gjtm_6_22

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Background and Objectives: COVID-19 has infected and caused the deaths of millions of people globally with India being the second most affected country in the world. The primary objective of the study was to determine the seroprevalence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS CoV-2) antibodies in healthy blood donors in North India. The secondary objective of the study was to find the association of vaccination and infection with seropositivity in the blood donors. Methods: All blood donor samples were screened for the presence of IgG antibodies against SARS CoV2 spike (S1) protein. Anti-SARS CoV2 IgG antibody status, demographic data, history of past COVID infection, and vaccination of all eligible donors in the study period were collected. Seroprevalence was calculated as the percentage of total number of donors positive for anti-SARS CoV2 IgG antibodies. Month-wise seroprevalence was also calculated and analyzed. Results: Out of 1456 donors, 874 were found to be seropositive, resulting in a seroprevalence of 60%. Seroprevalence was found to be 38.3% and 77%, respectively, in the months of April and May 21. Seropositivity was 100%, 92%, 79%, and 54% in those with a history of both COVID infection and vaccination, vaccination only, infection only, and no history of vaccination or infection, respectively. Conclusion: Blood donors represent an easy access to seroprevalence studies and need to be tapped at the national level to obtain a temporal picture of the COVID-19 situation to guide healthcare policies, mark regions where vaccination drives need to be intensified.


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